A couple days ago I read the last lecture within the online course about the brand launching. I thought: “Wow, these guys made some very cool points”. Inspiration was obvious, so I decided to share their (and mine) thoughts with BMS readers. We talked about branding before, whether through associations, personal branding or rebranding strategies. Nevertheless, the question is how to create the brand from the scratch? Imagine starting a company that is completely new in the market and no one has ever heard of. You cannot launch a product only, but also a brand. Sounds like a challenge, indeed, but far from impossible. Branding is and will always be a hot topic. I am going to cover this topic in three parts so check out further some ideas I have come across.

As any other process, a brand launching does not happen over night. Truth is, the launch day happens once, but the whole process behind is way longer.

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Every journey starts with a single step. Don’t be afraid to brainstorm for creative ideas, but don’t lose the focus on your goal.

From where to start then?

It is pretty easy and you can guess- market research. I am not planning to dive into this topic, just want to mention that market research is important for the brand launch because of the magic word- anticipation. The definition of the word says it all- a feeling of excitement about something that is going to happen. If you know your demographics, the need in the market, what grabs the attention, what increases the traffic to the website and give a lot of effort to engage with your audience even before the actual launch day, then you have a good chance that you have already created a hype. For those that are more into the specific topic, Guy Kawasaki’s classic is always a good place to start.

Your brand identity is what makes you standing out of the crowd

Your brand identity is what makes you standing out of the crowd

I do not have to tell you that company needs to differentiate its brand. Understanding the unique value proposition might be the key and going to specific is never a mistake. As I have learned, a good place to start with differentiation marketing is to create a solid elevator pitch. In case you want to know more about it, have a look at the article here. It is not easy to say shortly about what is the business about, but there are some techniques which might assist in being on the right point. Seth Godin is a marketing guru I have been following for years already, and his book Purple Cow is a good source of information for making your product different. Seth has a very easy-to-read way of explaining things and I am sure it is understandable even for non-marketers.

The key is to do the marketing before and not after the launch. This means that processes like production, creating a website, thinking about the design, content, and media happen simultaneously with marketing strategy. It takes time for people to get to know the product before it is available. During this phase, KPI (key performance indicators) is something to think about. Depending on the goals, KPIs define the number of followers on social media, sales, traffic to the website, etc. I have already ordered my copy of the book called Traction: How any startup can achieve explosive customer growthBased on the content, it has a lot to offer, so I am looking forward to dive in. Another piece of work that I recommend is the book called Hooked: How to build habit- forming productsThe book talks about the reasons why customers engage with some products.

The ideas to take home from the Part 1 of the article on brand launching are also the first three steps in the process:

  1. Do the extensive market research to get to know the audience.
  2. Differentiate the brand in order to create a distinguished brand identity.
  3. Do the marketing before the launch.

In the next Part, I will tell you ideas about the interface and the first direct contact with the audience/target market. These are important aspects of a brand identity. Stay tuned.

Special thanks and credits to Highbrow, the source of my inspiration.